Travis Sky Ingersoll, PH.D., MSW, M.ED. - Social Work & Sexual Health Education/Consulting/Research
My Blog

Sexualization

Older Adult Survivors of Sexual Abuse

This is an excerpt my chapter (Ch.6) titled "Intimate Relationships" in the new textbookHealthy Ageing and Aged Care(Edited by Maree Bernoth & Denise Winkler) published by Oxford University Press.  

Adult Survivors Of Sexual Abuse

One of the most neglected issues in discussions regarding older adult care is the impact of past childhood or adolescent sexual abuse. Statistics reveal that between 12% and 40% of adults have experienced some form of abuse in their past (Walker, Torkelson, Katon & Koss, 1993).

Men in the Fight Against Domestic Violence


Introduction

Intimate partner violence is a significant problem in the United States of America.  Each year an estimated 5.3 million women experience some form of abuse by their intimate partner; nearly 1 million are violently assaulted (National Domestic Violence Hotline, 2007), and more tragically, 1,232 are murdered (American Institute on Domestic Violence, 2007).  Widespread public awareness of domestic violence was brought to the forefront during the 1970s.  In conjunction with the feminist rights movement, a grassroots effort to combat domestic violence, spearheaded by domestic violence victims, called attention to the injustices suffered by women at the hands of their male companions.

Sexuality Concepts for Social Workers

It's finally available! If you found the information in my sexuality blog posts interesting and informative, you'll love having access to all the important and relevant sexuality research and information contained in my textbook!
Here's the link that will show you how to get a free preview of our textbook. You can also order a copy for yourself, or adopt it for a class you teach:
This is how Cognella describes our book:
 
Description

A Comprehensive Framework for Understanding Human Sexuality

A comprehensive framework for understanding human sexuality
 
 
 
Sexualityis an essential aspect of being human and contributes to the development of our identity throughout our lives.  As a construct, sexuality is not easily defined.  What do you think when you hearthe word sex?  If “intercourse” is the first thing you think of, congratulations, you’re among the norm.  Human sexuality, however, is far more than simply a physical thing.  Although it canbe physical, it is also mental, emotional, relational, biological, spiritual,cultural, and psychological.

How do you prevent sexual violence in relationships?

Answer:

Healthy relationships are consensual, non-exploitive, mutually pleasurable, safe, developmentally appropriate, based on mutual expectations, caring and respectful. Any sexual relationship that cannot be described in those terms should probably be carefully examined; something may be wrong, possible very wrong!  On US college campuses, approximately 20-25% of college females become victims of an attempted or completed rape at some point during their college career (American College Health Association, 2008).
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint